Making Samba 4 the default LDAP server

Earlier this year Andrew Bartlett set me the challenge: how could we make Samba 4 the default LDAP server in use for Linux and UNIX systems? I’ve finally decided to tackle this, and write up some simple changes we can make, and decide on some long term goals to make this a reality.

What makes a unix directory anyway?

Great question - this is such a broad topic, even I don’t know if I can single out what it means. For the purposes of this exercise I’ll treat it as “what would we need from my previous workplace”. My previous workplace had a dedicated set of 389 Directory Server machines that served lookups mainly for email routing, application authentication and more. The didn’t really process a great deal of login traffic as the majority of the workstations were Windows - thus connected to AD.

What it did show was that Linux clients and applications:

  • Want to use anonymous binds and searchs - Applications and clients are NOT domain members - they just want to do searches
  • The content of anonymous lookups should be “public safe” information. (IE nothing private)
  • LDAPS is a must for binds
  • MemberOf and group filtering is very important for access control
  • sshPublicKey and userCertificate;binary is important for 2fa/secure logins

This seems like a pretty simple list - but it’s not the model Samba 4 or AD ship with.

You’ll also want to harden a few default settings. These include:

  • Disable Guest
  • Disable 10 machine join policy

AD works under the assumption that all clients are authenticated via kerberos, and that kerberos is the primary authentication and trust provider. As a result, AD often ships with:

  • Disabled anonymous binds - All clients are domain members or service accounts
  • No anonymous content available to search
  • No LDAPS (GSSAPI is used instead)
  • no sshPublicKey or userCertificates (pkinit instead via krb)
  • Access control is much more complex topic than just “matching an ldap filter”.

As a result, it takes a bit of effort to change Samba 4 to work in a way that suits both, securely.

Isn’t anonymous binding insecure?

Let’s get this one out the way - no it’s not. In every pen test I have seen if you can get access to a domain joined machine, you probably have a good chance of taking over the domain in various ways. Domain joined systems and krb allows lateral movement and other issues that are beyond the scope of this document.

The lack of anonymous lookup is more about preventing information disclosure - security via obscurity. But it doesn’t take long to realise that this is trivially defeated (get one user account, guest account, domain member and you can search …).

As a result, in some cases it may be better to allow anonymous lookups because then you don’t have spurious service accounts, you have a clear understanding of what is and is not accessible as readable data, and you don’t need every machine on the network to be domain joined - you prevent a possible foothold of lateral movement.

So anonymous binding is just fine, as the unix world has shown for a long time. That’s why I have very few concerns about enabling it. Your safety is in the access controls for searches, not in blocking anonymous reads outright.

Installing your DC

As I run fedora, you will need to build and install samba for source so you can access the heimdal kerberos functions. Fedora’s samba 4 ships ADDC support now, but lacks some features like RODC that you may want. In the future I expect this will change though.

These documents will help guide you:

requirements

build steps

install a domain

I strongly advise you use options similar to:

/usr/local/samba/bin/samba-tool domain provision --server-role=dc --use-rfc2307 --dns-backend=SAMBA_INTERNAL --realm=SAMDOM.EXAMPLE.COM --domain=SAMDOM --adminpass=Passw0rd

Allow anonymous binds and searches

Now that you have a working domain controller, we should test you have working ldap:

/usr/local/samba/bin/samba-tool forest directory_service dsheuristics 0000002 -H ldaps://localhost --simple-bind-dn='administrator@samdom.example.com'
ldapsearch -b DC=samdom,DC=example,DC=com -H ldaps://localhost -x

You can see the domain object but nothing else. Many other blogs and sites recommend a blanket “anonymous read all” access control, but I think that’s too broad. A better approach is to add the anonymous read to only the few containers that require it.

/usr/local/samba/bin/samba-tool dsacl set --objectdn=DC=samdom,DC=example,DC=com --sddl='(A;;RPLCLORC;;;AN)' --simple-bind-dn="administrator@samdom.example.com" --password=Passw0rd
/usr/local/samba/bin/samba-tool dsacl set --objectdn=CN=Users,DC=samdom,DC=example,DC=com --sddl='(A;CI;RPLCLORC;;;AN)' --simple-bind-dn="administrator@samdom.example.com" --password=Passw0rd
/usr/local/samba/bin/samba-tool dsacl set --objectdn=CN=Builtin,DC=samdom,DC=example,DC=com --sddl='(A;CI;RPLCLORC;;;AN)' --simple-bind-dn="administrator@samdom.example.com" --password=Passw0rd

In AD groups and users are found in cn=users, and some groups are in cn=builtin. So we allow read to the root domain object, then we set a read on cn=users and cn=builtin that inherits to it’s child objects. The attribute policies are derived elsewhere, so we can assume that things like kerberos data and password material are safe with these simple changes.

Configuring LDAPS

This is a reasonable simple exercise. Given a ca cert, key and cert we can place these in the correct locations samba expects. By default this is the private directory. In a custom install, that’s /usr/local/samba/private/tls/, but for distros I think it’s /var/lib/samba/private. Simply replace ca.pem, cert.pem and key.pem with your files and restart.

Adding schema

To allow adding schema to samba 4 you need to reconfigure the dsdb config on the schema master. To show the current schema master you can use:

/usr/local/samba/bin/samba-tool fsmo show -H ldaps://localhost --simple-bind-dn='administrator@adt.blackhats.net.au' --password=Password1

Look for the value:

SchemaMasterRole owner: CN=NTDS Settings,CN=LDAPKDC,CN=Servers,CN=Default-First-Site-Name,CN=Sites,CN=Configuration,DC=adt,DC=blackhats,DC=net,DC=au

And note the CN=ldapkdc = that’s the hostname of the current schema master.

On the schema master we need to adjust the smb.conf. The change you need to make is:

[global]
    dsdb:schema update allowed = yes

Now restart the instance and we can update the schema. The following LDIF should work if you replace ${DOMAINDN} with your namingContext. You can apply it with ldapmodify

dn: CN=sshPublicKey,CN=Schema,CN=Configuration,DC=adt,DC=blackhats,DC=net,DC=au
changetype: add
objectClass: top
objectClass: attributeSchema
attributeID: 1.3.6.1.4.1.24552.500.1.1.1.13
cn: sshPublicKey
name: sshPublicKey
lDAPDisplayName: sshPublicKey
description: MANDATORY: OpenSSH Public key
attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.10
oMSyntax: 4
isSingleValued: FALSE
searchFlags: 8

dn: CN=ldapPublicKey,CN=Schema,CN=Configuration,DC=adt,DC=blackhats,DC=net,DC=au
changetype: add
objectClass: top
objectClass: classSchema
governsID: 1.3.6.1.4.1.24552.500.1.1.2.0
cn: ldapPublicKey
name: ldapPublicKey
description: MANDATORY: OpenSSH LPK objectclass
lDAPDisplayName: ldapPublicKey
subClassOf: top
objectClassCategory: 3
defaultObjectCategory: CN=ldapPublicKey,CN=Schema,CN=Configuration,DC=adt,DC=blackhats,DC=net,DC=au
mayContain: sshPublicKey

dn: CN=User,CN=Schema,CN=Configuration,DC=adt,DC=blackhats,DC=net,DC=au
changetype: modify
replace: auxiliaryClass
auxiliaryClass: ldapPublicKey
auxiliaryClass: posixAccount
auxiliaryClass: shadowAccount
-
sudo ldapmodify -f sshpubkey.ldif -D 'administrator@adt.blackhats.net.au' -w Password1 -H ldaps://localhost
adding new entry "CN=sshPublicKey,CN=Schema,CN=Configuration,DC=adt,DC=blackhats,DC=net,DC=au"

adding new entry "CN=ldapPublicKey,CN=Schema,CN=Configuration,DC=adt,DC=blackhats,DC=net,DC=au"

modifying entry "CN=User,CN=Schema,CN=Configuration,DC=adt,DC=blackhats,DC=net,DC=au"

To my surprise, userCertificate already exists! The reason I missed it is a subtle ad schema behaviour I missed. The ldap attribute name is stored in the lDAPDisplayName and may not be the same as the CN of the schema element. As a result, you can find this with:

ldapsearch -H ldaps://localhost -b CN=Schema,CN=Configuration,DC=adt,DC=blackhats,DC=net,DC=au -x -D 'administrator@adt.blackhats.net.au' -W '(attributeId=2.5.4.36)'

This doesn’t solve my issues: Because I am a long time user of 389-ds, that means I need some ns compat attributes. Here I add the nsUniqueId value so that I can keep some compatability.

dn: CN=nsUniqueId,CN=Schema,CN=Configuration,DC=adt,DC=blackhats,DC=net,DC=au
changetype: add
objectClass: top
objectClass: attributeSchema
attributeID: 2.16.840.1.113730.3.1.542
cn: nsUniqueId
name: nsUniqueId
lDAPDisplayName: nsUniqueId
description: MANDATORY: nsUniqueId compatability
attributeSyntax: 2.5.5.10
oMSyntax: 4
isSingleValued: TRUE
searchFlags: 9

dn: CN=nsOrgPerson,CN=Schema,CN=Configuration,DC=adt,DC=blackhats,DC=net,DC=au
changetype: add
objectClass: top
objectClass: classSchema
governsID: 2.16.840.1.113730.3.2.334
cn: nsOrgPerson
name: nsOrgPerson
description: MANDATORY: Netscape DS compat person
lDAPDisplayName: nsOrgPerson
subClassOf: top
objectClassCategory: 3
defaultObjectCategory: CN=nsOrgPerson,CN=Schema,CN=Configuration,DC=adt,DC=blackhats,DC=net,DC=au
mayContain: nsUniqueId

dn: CN=User,CN=Schema,CN=Configuration,DC=adt,DC=blackhats,DC=net,DC=au
changetype: modify
replace: auxiliaryClass
auxiliaryClass: ldapPublicKey
auxiliaryClass: posixAccount
auxiliaryClass: shadowAccount
auxiliaryClass: nsOrgPerson
-

Now with this you can extend your users with the required data for SSH, certificates and maybe 389-ds compatability.

/usr/local/samba/bin/samba-tool user edit william  -H ldaps://localhost --simple-bind-dn='administrator@adt.blackhats.net.au'

Performance

Out of the box a number of the unix attributes are not indexed by Active Directory. To fix this you need to update the search flags in the schema.

Again, temporarily allow changes:

[global]
    dsdb:schema update allowed = yes

Now we need to add some indexes for common types. Note that in the nsUniqueId schema I already added the search flags. We also want to set that these values should be preserved if they become tombstones so we can recove them.

/usr/local/samba/bin/samba-tool schema attribute modify uid --searchflags=9
/usr/local/samba/bin/samba-tool schema attribute modify nsUniqueId --searchflags=9
/usr/local/samba/bin/samba-tool schema attribute modify uidnumber --searchflags=9
/usr/local/samba/bin/samba-tool schema attribute modify gidnumber --searchflags=9
# Preserve on tombstone but don't index
/usr/local/samba/bin/samba-tool schema attribute modify x509-cert --searchflags=8
/usr/local/samba/bin/samba-tool schema attribute modify sshPublicKey --searchflags=8
/usr/local/samba/bin/samba-tool schema attribute modify gecos --searchflags=8
/usr/local/samba/bin/samba-tool schema attribute modify loginShell --searchflags=8
/usr/local/samba/bin/samba-tool schema attribute modify home-directory --searchflags=24

AD Hardening

We want to harden a few default settings that could be considered insecure. First, let’s stop “any user from being able to domain join machines”.

/usr/local/samba/bin/samba-tool domain settings account_machine_join_quota 0 -H ldaps://localhost --simple-bind-dn='administrator@adt.blackhats.net.au'

Now let’s disable the Guest account

/usr/local/samba/bin/samba-tool user disable Guest -H ldaps://localhost --simple-bind-dn='administrator@adt.blackhats.net.au'

I plan to write a more complete samba-tool extension for auditing these and more options, so stay tuned!

SSSD configuration

Now that our directory service is configured, we need to configure our clients to utilise it correctly.

Here is my SSSD configuration, that supports sshPublicKey distribution, userCertificate authentication on workstations and SID -> uid mapping. In the future I want to explore sudo rules in LDAP with AD, and maybe even HBAC rules rather than GPO.

Please refer to my other blog posts on configuration of the userCertificates and sshKey distribution.

[domain/blackhats.net.au]
ignore_group_members = False

debug_level=3
# There is a bug in SSSD where this actually means "ipv6 only".
# lookup_family_order=ipv6_first
cache_credentials = True
id_provider = ldap
auth_provider = ldap
access_provider = ldap
chpass_provider = ldap
ldap_search_base = dc=blackhats,dc=net,dc=au

# This prevents an infinite referral loop.
ldap_referrals = False
ldap_id_mapping = True
ldap_schema = ad
# Rather that being in domain users group, create a user private group
# automatically on login.
# This is very important as a security setting on unix!!!
# See this bug if it doesn't work correctly.
# https://pagure.io/SSSD/sssd/issue/3723
auto_private_groups = true

ldap_uri = ldaps://ad.blackhats.net.au
ldap_tls_reqcert = demand
ldap_tls_cacert = /etc/pki/tls/certs/bh_ldap.crt

# Workstation access
ldap_access_filter = (memberOf=CN=Workstation Operators,CN=Users,DC=blackhats,DC=net,DC=au)

ldap_user_member_of = memberof
ldap_user_gecos = cn
ldap_user_uuid = objectGUID
ldap_group_uuid = objectGUID
# This is really important as it allows SSSD to respect nsAccountLock
ldap_account_expire_policy = ad
ldap_access_order = filter, expire
# Setup for ssh keys
ldap_user_ssh_public_key = sshPublicKey
# This does not require ;binary tag with AD.
ldap_user_certificate = userCertificate
# This is required for the homeDirectory to be looked up in the sssd schema
ldap_user_home_directory = homeDirectory


[sssd]
services = nss, pam, ssh, sudo
config_file_version = 2
certificate_verification = no_verification

domains = blackhats.net.au
[nss]
homedir_substring = /home

[pam]
pam_cert_auth = True

[sudo]

[autofs]

[ssh]

[pac]

[ifp]

Conclusion

With these simple changes we can easily make samba 4 able to perform the roles of other unix focused LDAP servers. This allows stateless clients, secure ssh key authentication, certificate authentication and more.

Some future goals to improve this include:

  • CLI tools to manage sshPublicKeys and userCertificates easily
  • Ship samba 4 with schema templates that can be used
  • Schema querying (what objectclass takes this attribute?)
  • Group editing (same as samba-tool user edit)
  • Security auditing tools
  • user/group modification commands
  • Refactor and improve the cli tools python to be api driven - move the logic from netcmd into samdb so that samdb can be an API that python can consume easier. Prevent duplication of logic.

The goal is so that an admin never has to see an LDIF ever again.