SUSE Open Build Service cheat sheet

Part of starting at SUSE has meant that I get to learn about Open Build Service. I’ve known that the project existed for a long time but I have never had a chance to use it. So far I’m thoroughly impressed by how it works and the features it offers.

As A Consumer

The best part of OBS is that it’s trivial on OpenSUSE to consume content from it. Zypper can add projects with the command:

zypper ar obs://<project name> <repo nickname>
zypper ar obs://network:ldap network:ldap

I like to give the repo nickname (your choice) to be the same as the project name so I know what I have enabled. Once you run this you can easily consume content from OBS.

Package Management

As someone who has started to contribute to the suse 389-ds package, I’ve been slowly learning how this work flow works. OBS similar to GitHub/Lab allows a branching and request model.

On OpenSUSE you will want to use the osc tool for your workflow:

zypper in osc
# If you plan to use the "service" command
zypper in obs-service-tar obs-service-obs_scm obs-service-recompress obs-service-set_version obs-service-download_files

You can branch from an existing project to make changes with:

osc branch <project> <package>
osc branch network:ldap 389-ds

This will branch the project to my home namespace. For me this will land in “home:firstyear:branches:network:ldap”. Now I can checkout the content on to my machine to work on it.

osc co <project>
osc co home:firstyear:branches:network:ldap

This will create the folder “home:…:ldap” in the current working directory.

From here you can now work on the project. Some useful commands are:

Add new files to the project (patches, new source tarballs etc).

osc add <path to file>
osc add feature.patch
osc add new-source.tar.xz

Edit the change log of the project (I think this is used in release notes?)

osc vc

To ammend your changes, use:

osc vc -e

Build your changes locally matching the system you are on. Packages normally build on all/most OpenSUSE versions and architectures, this will build just for your local system and arch.

osc build

Make sure you clean up files you aren’t using any more with:

osc rm <filename>
# This commands removes anything untracked by osc.
osc clean

Commit your changes to the OBS server, where a complete build will be triggered:

osc commit

View the results of the last commit:

osc results

Enable people to use your branch/project as a repository. You edit the project metadata and enable repo publishing:

osc meta prj -e <name of project>
osc meta prj -e home:firstyear:branches:network:ldap

# When your editor opens, change this section to enabled (disabled by default):
<publish>
  <enabled />
</publish>

NOTE: In some cases if you have the package already installed, and you add the repo/update it won’t install from your repo. This is because in SUSE packages have a notion of “vendoring”. They continue to update from the same repo as they were originally installed from. So if you want to change this you use:

zypper [d]up --from <repo name>

You can then create a “request” to merge your branch changes back to the project origin. This is:

osc sr

A helpful maintainer will then review your changes. You can see this with.

osc rq show <your request id>

If you change your request, to submit again, use:

osc sr

And it will ask if you want to replace (supercede) the previous request.

I was also helped by a friend to provie a “service” configuration that allows generation of tar balls from git. It’s not always appropriate to use this, but if the repo has a “_service” file, you can regenerate the tar with:

osc service ra

So far this is as far as I have gotten with OBS, but I already appreciate how great this work flow is for package maintainers, reviewers and consumers. It’s a pleasure to work with software this well built.

As an additional piece of information, it’s a good idea to read the OBS Packaging Guidelines
to be sure that you are doing the right thing!