Webauthn UserVerificationPolicy Curiosities

Recently I received a pair of interesting bugs in Webauthn RS where certain types of authenticators would not work in Firefox, but did work in Chromium. This confused me, and I couldn’t reproduce the behaviour. So like any obsessed person I ordered myself one of the affected devices and waited for Australia Post to lose it, find it, lose it again, and then finally deliver the device 2 months later.

In the meantime I swapped browsers from Firefox to Edge and started to notice some odd behaviour when logging into my corporate account - my yubikey began to ask me for my pin on every authentication, even though the key was registered to the corp servers without a pin. Yet the key kept working on Edge with a pin - and confusingly without a pin on Firefox.

Some background on Webauthn

Before we dive into the issue, we need to understand some details about Webauthn. Webauthn is a standard that allows a client (commonly a web browser) to cryptographically authenticate to a server (commonly a web site). Webauthn defines how different types of hardware cryptographic authenticators may communicate between the client and the server.

An example of some types of authenticator devices are U2F tokens (yubikeys), TouchID (Apple Mac, iPhone, iPad), Trusted Platform Modules (Windows Hello) and many more. Webauthn has to account for differences in these hardware classes and how they communicate, but in the end each device performs a set of asymmetric cryptographic (public/private key) operations.

Webauthn defines the structures of how a client and server communicate to both register new authenticators and subsequently authenticate with those authenticators.

For the first step of registration, the server provides a registration challenge to the client. The structure of this (which is important for later) looks like:

dictionary PublicKeyCredentialCreationOptions {
    required PublicKeyCredentialRpEntity         rp;
    required PublicKeyCredentialUserEntity       user;

    required BufferSource                             challenge;
    required sequence<PublicKeyCredentialParameters>  pubKeyCredParams;

    unsigned long                                timeout;
    sequence<PublicKeyCredentialDescriptor>      excludeCredentials = [];
    AuthenticatorSelectionCriteria               authenticatorSelection = {
        AuthenticatorAttachment      authenticatorAttachment;
        boolean                      requireResidentKey = false;
        UserVerificationRequirement  userVerification = "preferred";
    };
    AttestationConveyancePreference              attestation = "none";
    AuthenticationExtensionsClientInputs         extensions;
};

The client then takes this structure, and creates a number of hashes from it which the authenticator then signs. This signed data and options are returned to the server as a PublicKeyCredential containing an Authenticator Attestation Response.

Next is authentication. The server sends a challenge to the client which has the structure:

dictionary PublicKeyCredentialRequestOptions {
    required BufferSource                challenge;
    unsigned long                        timeout;
    USVString                            rpId;
    sequence<PublicKeyCredentialDescriptor> allowCredentials = [];
    UserVerificationRequirement          userVerification = "preferred";
    AuthenticationExtensionsClientInputs extensions;
};

Again, the client takes this structure, takes a number of hashes and the authenticator signs this to prove it is the holder of the private key. The signed response is sent to the server as a PublicKeyCredential containing an Authenticator Assertion Response.

Key to this discussion is the following field:

UserVerificationRequirement          userVerification = "preferred";

This is present in both PublicKeyCredentialRequestOptions and PublicKeyCredentialCreationOptions. This informs what level of interaction assurance should be provided during the signing process. These are discussed in NIST SP800-64b (5.1.7, 5.1.9) (which is just an excellent document anyway, so read it).

One aspect of these authenticators is that they must provide tamper proof evidence that a person is physically present and interacting with the device for the signature to proceed. This is important as it means that if someone is able to gain remote code execution on your system, they are unable to use your authenticator devices (even if it’s part of the device, like touch id) as they are not physically present at the machine.

Some authenticators are able to go beyond to strengthen this assurance, by verifying the identity of the person interacting with the authenticator. This means that the interaction also requires say a PIN (something you know), or a biometric (something you are). This allows the authenticator to assert not just that someone is present but that it is a specific person who is present.

All authenticators are capable of asserting user presence but only some are capable of asserting user verification. This creates two classes of authenticators as defined by NIST SP800-64b.

Single-Factor Cryptographic Devices (5.1.7) which only assert presence (the device becomes something you have) and Multi-Factor Cryptographic Devices (5.1.9) which assert the identity of the holder (something you have + something you know/are).

Webauthn is able to request the use of a Single-Factor Device or Multi-Factor Device through it’s UserVerificationRequirement option. The levels are:

  • Discouraged - Only use Single-Factor Devices
  • Required - Only use Multi-Factor Devices
  • Preferred - Request Multi-Factor if possible, but allow Single-Factor devices.

Back to the mystery …

When I initially saw these reports - of devices that did not work in Firefox but did in Chromium, and of devices asking for PINs on some browsers but not others - I was really confused. The breakthrough came as I was developing Webauthn Authenticator RS. This is the client half of Webauthn, so that I could have the Kanidm CLI tools use Webauthn for multi-factor authentication (MFA). In the process, I have been using the authenticator crate made by Mozilla and used by Firefox.

The authenticator crate is what communicates to authenticators by NFC, Bluetooth, or USB. Due to the different types of devices, there are multiple different protocols involved. For U2F devices, the protocol is CTAP over USB. There are two versions of the CTAP protocol - CTAP1, and CTAP2.

In the authenticator crate, only CTAP1 is supported. CTAP1 devices are unable to accept a PIN, so user verification must be performed internally to the device (such as a fingerprint reader built into the U2F device).

Chromium, however, is able to use CTAP2 - CTAP2 does allow a PIN to be provided from the host machine to the device as a user verification method.

Why would devices fail in Firefox?

Once I had learnt this about CTAP1/CTAP2, I realised that my example code in Webauthn RS was hardcoding Required as the user verification level. Since Firefox can only use CTAP1, it was unable to use PINs to U2F devices, so they would not respond to the challenge. But on Chromium with CTAP2 they are able to have PINs so Required can be satisfied and the devices work.

Okay but the corp account?

This one is subtle. The corp identity system uses user verification of ‘Preferred’. That meant that on Firefox, no PIN was requested since CTAP1 can’t provide them, but on Edge/Chromium a PIN can be provided as they use CTAP2.

What’s more curious is that the same authenticator device is flipping between Single Factor and Multi Factor, with the same Private/Public Key pair just based on what protocol is used! So even though the ‘Preferred’ request can be satisfied on Chromium/Edge, it’s not on Firefox. To further extend my confusion, the device was originally registered to the corp identity system in Firefox so it would have not had user verification available, but now that I use Edge it has gained this requirement during authentication.

That seems … wrong.

I agree. But Webauthn fully allows this. This is because user verification is a property of the request/response flow, not a property of the device.

This creates some interesting side effects that become an opportunity for user confusion. (I was confused about what the behaviour was and I write a webauthn server and client library - imagine how other people feel …).

Devices change behaviour

This means that during registration one policy can be requested (i.e. Required) but subsequently it may not be used (Preferred + Firefox + U2F, or Discouraged). Another example of a change in behaviour occurs when a device is used on Chromium with Preferred user verification is required, but when used on Firefox the device may not require verification. It also means that a site that implements Required can have devices that simply don’t work in other browsers.

Because this is changing behaviour it can confuse users. For examples:

  • Why do I need a PIN now but not before?
  • Why did I need a PIN before but not now?
  • Why does my authenticator work on this computer but not on another?

Preferred becomes Discouraged

This opens up a security risk where since Preferred “attempts” verification but allows it to not be present, a U2F device can be “downgraded” from Multi-Factor to Single-Factor by using it with CTAP1 instead of CTAP2. Since it’s also per request/response, a compromised client could also tamper with the communication to the authenticator removing the requested userverification parameter silently and the server would allow it.

This means that in reality, Preferred is policy and security wise equivalent to Discouraged, but with a more annoying UI/UX for users who have to conduct a verification that doesn’t actually help identify them.

Remember - if unspecified, ‘Preferred’ is the default user verification policy in Webauthn!

Lock Out / Abuse Vectors

There is also a potential abuse vector here. Many devices such as U2F tokens perform a “trust on first use” for their PIN setup. This means that the first time a user verification is requested you configure the pin at that point in time.

A potential abuse vector here is a token that is always used on Firefox, a malicious person could connect the device to Chromium, and setup the PIN without the knowledge of the owner. The owner could continue to use the device, and when Firefox eventually supports CTAP2, or they swap computer or browser, they would not know the PIN, and their token would effectively be unusable at that point. They would need to reset it, potentially causing them to be locked out from accounts, but more likely causing them to need to conduct a lot of password/credential resets.

Unable to implement Authenticator Policy

One of the greatest issues here though is that because user verification is part of the request/response flow and not per device attributes, authenticator policy, and mixed credentials are unable to exist in the current implementation of Webauthn.

Consider a user who has enrolled say their laptop’s U2F device + password, and their iPhone’s touchID to a server. Both of these are Multi Factor credentials. The U2F is a Single Factor Device and becomes Multi-Factor in combination with the password. The iPhone touchID is a Multi-Factor Device on it’s due to the biometric verification it is capable of.

We should be able to have a website request webauthn and based on the device used we can flow to the next required step. If the device was the iPhone, we would be authenticated as we have authenticated a Multi Factor credentials. If we saw the U2F device we would then move to request the password since we have only received a Single Factor. However Webauthn is unable to express this authentication flow.

If we requested Required, we would exclude the U2F device.

If we requested Discouraged, we would exclude the iPhone.

If we request Preferred, the U2F device could be used on a different browser with CTAP2, either:

  • bypassing the password, since the device is now a self contained Multi-Factor; or
  • the U2F device could prompt for the PIN needlessly and we progress to setting a password

The request to an iPhone could be tampered with, preventing the verification occurring and turning it into a single factor device (presence only).

Today, these mixed device scenarios can not exist in Webauthn. We are unable to create the policy around Single-Factor and Multi-Factor devices as defined by NIST because these require us to assert the verification requirements per credential, but Webauthn can not satisfy this.

We would need to pre-ask the user how they want to authenticate on that device and then only send a Webauthn challenge that can satisfy the authentication policy we have decided on for those credentials.

How to fix this

The solution here is to change PublicKeyCredentialDescriptor in the Webauthn standard to contain an optional UserVerificationRequirement field. This would allow a “global” default set by the server and then per-credential requirements to be defined. This would allow the user verification properties during registration to be associated to that credential, which can then be enforced by the server to guarantee the behaviour of a webauthn device. It would also allow the ‘Preferred’ option to have a valid and useful meaning during registration, where devices capable of verification can provide that or not, and then that verification boolean can be then transformed to a Discouraged or Required setting for that credential for future authentications.

The second change would be to disallow ‘Preferred’ as a valid value in the “global” default during authentications. The new “default” global value should be ‘Discouraged’ and then only credentials that registered with verification would indicate that in their PublicKeyCredentialDescriptor.

This would resolve the issues above by:

  • Making the use of an authenticator consistent after registration. For example, authenticators registered with CTAP1 would stay ‘Discouraged’ even when used with CTAP2
  • If PIN/Verification abuse occurred, the credentials registered on CTAP1 without verification would continue to be ‘presence only’ preventing the lockout
  • Allowing the server to proceed with the authentication flow based on which credential authenticated and provide logic about further factors if needed.
  • Allowing true Single Factor and Multi Factor device policies to be expressed in line with NIST SP800-63b, so users can have a mix of Single and Multi Factor devices associated with a single account.

I have since opened this issue with the webauthn specification about this, but early comments seem to be highly focused on the current expression of the standard rather than the issues around the user experience and ability for identity systems to accurately express credential policy.

In the meantime, I am going to make changes to Webauthn RS to help avoid some of these issues:

  • Preferred will be renamed to Preferred_Is_Equivalent_To_Discouraged (it will still emit ‘Preferred’ in the JSON, this only changes the Rust API enum)
  • Credential structures persisted by applications will contain the boolean of user-verification if it occurred during registration
  • During an authentication, if the set of credentials contains inconsistent user-verification booleans, an error will be raised
  • Authentication User Verification Policy is derived from the set of credentials having a consistent user-verification boolean

While not perfect, it will mean that it’s “hard to hold it wrong” with Webauthn RS.

Acknowledgements

Thanks to both @Charcol0x89 and @JuxhinDB for reviewing this post.